The Second Annual Denver Mini Maker Faire!

The 2nd annual Denver Mini Maker Faire will be June 13th and 14th inside the Denver Museum of Nature & Science.  We are pulling out all the stops for this one – put it on your calendar!

Are you a Maker?

Check out our MAKERS page to see how you can exhibit at the 2015 Denver Mini Maker Faire and the Denver Museum of Nature & Science!

Maker Faire is an annual festival to make, create, learn, invent, craft, hack, recycle, build, think, play and be inspired.  Maker Faires are multi-generational gatherings sweeping across the country and around the world.

This Vertical Take-Off Drone is Like Your Own Mini Harrier Jet

Originally posted on Make::

Quadcopters are great at hovering, but don’t have long range. Fixed-wing aircraft can travel long distances quickly, but don’t like to stay in one place above the ground.

Krossblade’s SkyProwler solves both of those problems. The hybrid aircraft is a remote controlled quadcopter with wings, or a plane with six rotors, capable of vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL).

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After vertically taking off, its four quadcopter blades are retracted, as well as the landing gear. This allows it to fly unobstructed as an airplane. It can also take off like a normal airplane, then land vertically.prototype

If that wasn’t enough versatility, the wings can be removed, allowing it to fly in “hornet” mode as a high-speed quadcopter. As with many popular quadcopters, one can attach a GoPro for filming, or you can use the optional “Eye” camera with integrated gimbal stabilization for video. Flight can either be controlled manually or…

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The Denver Mini Maker Faire 2015 Call for Makers is Open!

The second annual Faire to be held in (and outside) of the

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The Sound Puddle at the 2014 Denver Mini Maker Faire Photo by John Martin

Attention all makers, tinkerers, inventors, hackers and do-it-yourselfers: The call for entries is now open for the Denver Mini Maker Faire! Strut your stuff in front of thousands of attendees over this two-day extravaganza of making. Any groups or individuals interested in participating should find out more and apply at www.denvermakerfaire.org. This unique family-friendly event draws makers from all over the State to celebrate their unbridled creativity. The Denver Mini Maker Faire team is looking for a wide variety of eclectic, diverse and out-of-the-box ideas that highlight the tinkerer spirit. Show off something from the categories below – or make up your own! This is a hands-on event, so please have your exhibit be something that demonstrates making.

Artisan Hall:

Metal arts, folk arts, woodworking, glassblowing, textiles spinning and weaving

Fun & Games:

Caine’s Arcade/Cardboard Challenge, Sculpture Games, Legos, Toy Hack

Rocket and Robots:

Robotics experience, rocket propulsion, Drones and things that Fly.

Tech tinkerers:

Electronics, Arduino, Raspberry Pi and the amazing things you do with them!

STEAM Celebration:

Innovation in education and youth STEAM projects (STEM + A for Arts).

Arts/Creativity:

Connectivity paint, wire, Steampunk, fine arts and urban arts.

Mad Scientists:

Denver Mad Scientists, Colorado Labs – NIST, NCAR, CIRES…science exhibitors

Pedal Power and Creative Cars:

Bikes, boards, scooters, Nerdy Derby, human powered Kinetic conveyances

Character Creators:

R2D2s, Stormtroopers, Daleks – Oh My!

Design and Creation:

From 3D design to creating with tools such as CNC milling, welding, waterjets

Exhibits and displays can range from the categories above plus anything you can imagine from biotech to puppets, school projects to innovative corporate projects, kites to unique tools or machines. Show us what you can create! Hit the Apply for Makers button at www.denvermakerfaire.org and tell us what you are dreaming. We’ll get back to you to discuss your project and let you know if you are IN! The Call for Makers is open from now through March 15. After this date we will accept projects only on a space available basis up through May 1.

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The maker community crosses boundaries of science and art, young and old, craftsmanship and technology, coming together to create the innovation economy. The things we make define us as a society and build our future.

The Denver Mini Maker Faire is an offshoot of the celebrated Maker Faire  created in the SF Bay area that draws over 100,000 annually from all around the world for “The Greatest Show and Tell on Earth!” The Denver Mini Maker Faire is generously supported by Presenting Sponsors SparkFun Electronics and Make Magazine. Colorado Maker Sponsors include Epilog Laser and Aleph/Lulzbot 3D printers. From Monkey Hunter Physics to a Drone Obstacle course to a Synthesizer Petting Zoo, there is something for everyone.   To follow the development of the Faire and also learn more about the emerging Maker Movement and community resources for Makers, visit the website at www.denvermakerfaire.org. The Denver Mini Maker faire is independently produced by Making Progress 501(c)3 in collaboration with Maker Media.

We Can’t Wait to Try Leatherman’s New Wearable

Originally posted on Make::

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A new wearable popped up yesterday, called Tread, from Leatherman. A metal bracelet, modeled kind of like a watch band, with links that come apart and function as Allen wrenches, screwdrivers, wire strippers, and more of the features you expect from multitools. As makers, it tripped our triggers both because it’s a wearable (see our latest issue, Volume 43) and because it’s a tool. (Er, several, really.)

It’s stainless steel, Leatherman claims it has 25 distinct tools, and it’s expected to be between $150 and $200, though they don’t say whether that’s for the version with the watch or not. Not cheap, certainly. But it folds up elegantly, is actually rather classy looking, and is apparently TSA compliant.

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Banter around the office is probably more because we’re tool nerds than anything else.

“Yeah, I need one of those.”

“Well, I’ve got two arms, so I need two.”

Unfortunately…

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A Lecture Series for the Makers of Things

Originally posted on Make::

Danielle George and the robotic orchestra. (Credit: Paul Wilkinson Photography) Prof. Danielle George and the robotic orchestra. (Credit: Paul Wilkinson Photography)

The Royal Institution‘s annual Christmas Lectures have been given every year since 1825—except between 1939 and 1942 when lectures were suspended due to the war and ‘the lack of children in London.’

The lectures have always been about introducing a younger audience—11 to 17 year olds—to a subject through ‘spectacular demonstrations.’ However this year’s the lectures, given by Prof. Danielle George, departed from the traditional—they were  about the maker movement.

Broadcast in between Christmas and New Year on BBC Four up till now they were only available on BBC iPlayer. However the first of the Christmas Lectures has now been made available on the Ri Channel for those of you in the rest of the world beyond the shores of the British Isles. The second and third lectures will be up shortly.

I talked to Olympia Brown—the Royal Institution‘s…

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3D Printing Brings Schooling Home

Originally posted on Make::

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There are two means of incorporating 3D printing into a homeschool plan. One, of course, is by getting a 3D printer for your home. (More on that later.) A simpler means is through a veritable wealth of amazing pre-made models to be found by the clever makers who post on Repables, YouMagine, or Thingiverse. All of these models are free to download and print at home. Many of the resources can be used in unit studies, as supplemental material to your curriculum, or can just be cool things to strew around the house for the interested to find and explore.

If your kids are teenagers, let them find and print the models themselves (some are more complicated than others). If your kids are younger, as most of mine are, print them and bring them out during a lesson on history or science. My kids love to ask…

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TechShop and Fujitsu Launch Mobile Makerspace for Student Education

Originally posted on Make::

Photo of the TechShop Inside trailer by Twitter user @oalexy Photo of the TechShop Inside trailer by Twitter user @oalexy

The nationwide chain of makerspaces known as the TechShop franchise has partnered up with Fujitsu the Japanese multinational IT equipment manufacturer to produce a mobile makerspace ready to hit the road.

Inside the 24 foot trailer is a wide variety of high tech tools including mini 3D printers, laser cutters, and laptop computers all stocked in an effort to bring a hands-on learning environment to nearby schools.

Details of the joint venture were released at the 1st Annual World Open Innovation Conference hosted at the Garwood Center for Corporate Innovation located on the University of California, Berkeley.

As the press release from TechShop states, this project “underscores a commitment to education and to increasing youth’s creativity and interest in science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM) fields through ‘learning by making,’ offering students hands-on activities and access to technologies.

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A Working 3D Printed Guitar

Originally posted on Make::

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Have you ever wondered if a working guitar could be 3D printed? That question has now been answered by Jeff Kerr’s beautifuly printed model.  Not only does it look great, it sounds very good too, as seen in the video below.

The design may seem a little strange if you’re expecting a wooden body, but once the initial shock is overcome, the translucent body of the guitar is quite beautiful. To support the thin shell, there are a number of fractal-inspired supports that don’t conduct light as readily, providing an interesting effect.

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Everything on the guitar is 3D printed, with the exception of the metal parts like strings and tuning keys. In addition to making this guitar, Jeff actually designed the printer that made it. The printing area is reportedly quite large, which, given the size of the guitar, would be quite helpful!

The…

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2014 Denver Mini Maker Faire Maker, Ira Sherman, Featured on Daily Planet

Ira Sherman

Ira Sherman, a maker at the 2014 Denver Mini Maker Faire, was featured on the Discovery Channel’s Daily Planet episode earlier this hear. Ira show off his one of a kind kinetic sculptures which were all the rage at both the San Francisco and Denver Maker Faires! Check out the video! Daily Planet – Ira Sherman

Terry Gold’s Blog Post on the Denver Mini Maker Faire!

Terry Gold, a Colorado based entrepreneur, who was able to attend the Denver Mini Maker Fair back in May. He claimed that “The best part was seeing all the kids running around, excited to see and get their hands on all the projects.” He also credited Sparkfun, one of our sponsors with an engaging set up. We are glad that Gold and other had such a good time at the Denver Mini Maker Faire. You can read the whole blog post here.

The NoCo Mini Maker Faire is happening October 4th-5th.

The Call for Makers is ongoing until August 31! If you want to me a maker be sure to sign up soon!

The Maker Movement Meets Big Business

Can indie-minded tinkerers get comfortable in the corporate world?

By Reena Jana

http://designmind.frogdesign.com/

Above, scenes from Genspace, a community biology lab in Brooklyn, NY: TED Fellow Oliver Medvedik, co-founder of Genspace; Medvedik and Genspace President and co-founder Ellen Jorgensen; experiments.

On a recent rainy morning I walked through the front door of a former bank in downtown Brooklyn to find myself in a dusty lobby with cracked windowpanes. An elevator ride took me to another floor where I found cluttered rooms filled with lopsided bookshelves, used beakers, and dirty wine glasses. Finally, I arrived at my destination: a NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION called Genspace, where an unlikely community of artists and attorneys, high school students and Ph.Ds, VENTURE CAPITALISTS, and architects regularly come together to get their hands dirty, literally—experimenting with, say, growing synthetic leather from bacterial cellulose. Continue reading